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20091101
20091130
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. alexander, age 12, monika, 14, and lisa, 15. >> translator: why this man took these three middle children upstairs we'll probably never get a final on that. you can imagine that it was getting a bit crowded. you must have guessed the more prisoners in the cellar the more complicated it became to look after them. >> taking the three middle children upstairs posed problems. how to explain the arrival of the babies? his solution was simple. elisabeth was a bad mother and had abandoned her children. a pattern was established in the middle of the night, a baby would be left on the fritzls' door step with a note from elisabeth, again, a letter the father forced her to write. >> translator: "i'm really sorry that i have to turn to you again. i hope lisa is doing well. she must have grown by now. monika is now 9 1/2 months old. she was breast fed for 7 1/2 months and now eats almost anything but she still likes the bottle best. the hole appetite has to be a little bigger for her." >> when the second baby arrived, the austrian press took note. mark perry covered the case for a local newspaper. >>
. are you in philadelphia? i'm sorry about that. and legal analyst lisa green. good morning to you. here's the story. how it goes. a pennsylvania couple was arrested for refusing to pay a tip at a restaurant. so here's what they did. the $73 food bill, they would not pay the mandatory 18% gratuity because they claimed bad service. then when they walked out the bartender rings up the cop who is then nail the couple for theft. so here's what the man had to say about all of this. here we go. >> i understand that you know, we did not pay the gratuity but it was a gratuity. it's not something that's not required. >> okay. lisa green, our legal expert. what would you suggest if someone has this happen to them? the business what, calls the cops on them for the gratuity. it's reflection of service. >> i'm not going to suggest that people bring an attorney with them every time they eat at a restaurant. >> good. >> but bring your reading glasses. if it says it's a mandatory gratuity, it says it on the menu and you read that, or should have read it before you sat down, i'm afraid it's not optional
into a fire hydrant and a treen front of his home. let's bring in our panel to weigh in all things tiger. lisa greene is a legal analyst, mark lamont hill at columbia university, marvet bruno is a public relations expert here in new york. good morning. okay. lisa first. a legal perspective, does tiger have to talk to the cops? >> no. and people are losing sight of this. this is a traffic accident investigation. the florida highway patrol has said that tiger's under no obligation to disclose information. all he was required to do is show that he's a licensed driver and registered. it's interesting and a decision has to be made by tiger and his team it looks like they plan to go forward today too talk about the investigation. we should remember what the highway patrol is investigating here is an accident. to the extent there are rumors, speculation, that is beyond their purr view and they tried to make that clear over the past couple of days. >> i found a couple of tweets. barkley will be happy. however, were you or i in this traffic accident wouldn't we feel compelled to and wouldn't we talk to
legal analyst lisa green. good morning. we're going to talk oprah first. she is starting her own cable network called own. this happens not till january of 2011. thus the end of her daily talk show. but all of this buzz about oprah and a replacement and all of that. let's take a listen to what ellen degeneres had to say about oprah. >> i think she has blaze add trail that is -- she's an amazing woman. she will always be the queen of daytime television, and she also said she's leaving me all of her money, which i really -- i was like gosh, thanks, oprah. thank you. >> will the daytime crown be passed to ellen? could this open doors for some people who may want talk shows like a couple come to mind now, sarah palin or kate gosselin? what do you think, mark? >> it's going to be tough to replace oprah. the market will open up and other people will have opportunities they wouldn't have if oprah were still there. it's difficult to fill oprah's shoes, she was one of the least polarizing people. sarah palin has at least half the country not watching her show because she's sarah palin. oprah wi
lisa green joining me right now. who is this dalia? >> she was an escort. >> oh. >> maybe the first mistake in this tawdry tale was for her husband to marry her because soon after that, alex, things went south. he started noticing money was missing, police calls to the house. she tried to spike his tea with anti-freeze. that didn't really achieve the desired result and than boyfriend asked for a hit. what typically happens, though, happily, is that the person sought after to achieve the hit informs police. in fact, from florida fl, fairly common crime. usually palm beach county has one of the cases going all the time. >> because of that, that's why they're so good at gathering the evidence? >> i think that's right and seem likes mountain of evidence against this woman, hundreds of pages of documents, video. apparent lay coup from "cops" there to capture this moment. it seems like they have plenty to work with prosecution wise. >> okay. so if you are on the defense and that is woman who allegedly tried to kill the husband three times, where do you do with this? >> typical defense wou
away with huge payoffs before the collapse. nbc's lisa myers reports. >> reporter: it was the early phase of the financial meltdown last year. first bear stearns was sold to avoid a collapse. thousands of employees lost jobs. a new study by experts at harvard law school titled wages of failure found that since 2000, the top five executives received staggering amounts of cash bonuses and sold mountains of stock. bear stearns cashed out $1.4 billion and lehman brothers $1 billion. >> people who invested in these companies should feel betrayed. the whole idea of capitalism is that the people provide the capital and the executives take care of it for us. in this case, the people provided their capital and the executives took it. >> reporter: the study found when the firms collapsed, james cane and richard fold lost about $900 million worth of stock. but the study said they still came out well ahead overall. cane walked away with $388 million, and fold, $541 million. >> they were rewarded hundreds of millions of dollars. they got that reward for making catastrophic decisions. >> last yea
such an important decision? here to face-off and talk about the politics, democratic strategist lisa menendez and former assistant to president george w. bush, brad blakeman. a lot of republicans could argue, too much time, why is he taking so much time on afghanistan? but why would dick cheney, after his five deferments and all the criticism of him and how he led to war in iraq, why would dick cheney defer to this? >> dick cheney should speak to things he knows about quite well. there were very few republicans that were privy to the top-secret information that dick cheney was. even president obama, as a united states senator, at the time he was running for president, was privy to a lot of the things he made decisions on that turned out to be wrong, like the surge. remember, president obama, as candidate obama, was against the surge and sided with people like harry reid who said our efforts was lost, the war was lost in iraq and he was wrong -- >> but dick cheney said iraq had nuclear weapons, and that was wrong too. >> well, no, dick cheney said -- he did not say iraq had -- >> he said on "m
away with millions. nbc lisa myers is here to talk more about this. critics say they were richly rewarded for failure. is that really true? >> i think that's an understatement, monica. this study by experts at harvard law school is appropriately titled wages of failure. it examined the pay of the top five executives at bear stearns and lehman brothers in the years before their firms imploded and it found that since 2000, the top executives at the two firms had received staggering amounts of cash bonuses and it sold mountains of stock. top bear stearns executives cashed out at about $1.4 million and top executives of lehman brothers cashed out about a billion dollars. dripped these during this period they were increasing the firm's leverage and making decisions which later turned out to be catastrophic. >> wow. that is shocking. is there going to be any fallout here? >> well, there really is not a lot that can be done. the stockholders are suing and -- but the ceos say, look. when the companies collapsed, we lost about 900 million dollars worth of stock each, but even counting the
stearns still walked away with millions. nbc news senior investigator correspondent lisa myers joins us now. >> hi, contessa and melissa. the study found that executives at lehman brothers and bear stearns catshed in big time in the years before their firms imploded. even though they suffered huge losses at the end, their ceos still walked away with hundreds of millions of dollars. critics call it being richly rewarded for failure. it was the early phase of the financial meltdown last year. first bear stearns was sold to avoid collapse. then lehman brothers went bankrupt. shareholders lost billions. and thousands of employees lost jobs. but a new study by experts at harvard law school titled "wages of failure" found that since 2000, the top five executives at each firm had received staggering amounts of cash bonuses and had sold mountains of stock. bear stearns executives cashed out about $1.4 billion. and lehman brothers, $1 billion. >> people who invested in these companies should feel betrayed. the whole idea of capitalism is that the people provide the capital, and the executives ta
ready for game day. >> reporter: while at u.s. airways hub in washington, lisa scott knows the routine well. what is the secret to staying sane if you're a flight attendant? >> yoga. lots of deep breaths. >> reporter: the airlines anticipate just under 2 million flyers to pass through all of the nation's airports today. but the busiest air travel days will be sunday and monday, with just over 2 million flyers each day. and 23 year veteran linwood harris know what they are thinking. >> thinking about the wonderful dinner at grandma's house and expectations of getting there on time and having their bag arrive with them as well. >> it's a family obligation. right? >> yeah. yeah! the heartland, going to be fun, going to be great. >> check in for your flight early and plan on arriving at the airport two hours ahead. >> reporter: the good news? thanksgiving 2009 looks to be knows and ice-free. >> weather is cooperating. passengers are moving well and flying is good. >> reporter: and that is what you want to hear, right? flying is good across the country. the key is going to be whether the ic
a new harvard study of risky bank behavior. lisa meyers following this one closely. >>> this study was done by experts at harvard law school and is appropriate titled wages of failure. the top five executives of bear stearns and lehman brothers. it found since 2000, top executives sold mountains of stock. and top bear stearns executives cashed out $1.4 billion, and top executives of lehman about $1 billion. when the companies collapsed, their ceo's lost $9 million worth of stock. and the ceos still came out ahead of the game. and james cayne came out with millions, and investors and employees of the two firms obviously did not do so well. thousands of employees lost jobs and many investors lost everything. and as you know, both men denied wrong doing and said their firms were swept under by a financial tsunami. cayne did apologize to the investors, and the other says he wakes up every night thinking what could i have done differently? >> thank you. we are learning more and more about things we already know. top executives at the bank, winding up at the ban sxk paying themselves out
're using, how angry they are, whether they're fed up with wall street and the story that lisa myers reported today where ceos made half a billion dollars, it's absurd, with $30 million penthows and $2 million apartments for their maids. people feel beat up, making less and less money, lost jobs, families have lost their jobs. there's no one here in washington that represents their interests. they feel sarah palin is one of them, a normal person, a mom. and if she doesn't get the facts right all the time, it's the media's fault and she's a regular joe and she can't read all the newspapers all the time. they like that about her. they connect that. and i think anybody who studies politics should look at that as a phenomena out there and recognize there's that much anger and disconnect with what's going on in washington that it's not represented, that people that feel like what's going on here is not representative of their thoughts and concern. >> andrew ross sorkin in 2008, ron paul ran. >> yes. >> and a lot of people that felt disconnected from washington got behind him. he always ta
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)